Routers

Joe BleasdaleJoe Bleasdale Registered User
Which router(s) do you guys use. I am looking for one to connect 1 H3, 2 DP8k, and to use as a wirless access point for a tablet PC. I am thinking an N1 router with at least 4 ports. Which ones do you guys use in your systems, and would you reccomend them?

Comments

  • jxgriffijxgriffi Registered User, DL Beta, Hog Beta
    edited January 2009
    I use a D-Link DI-524...it's old, but it's works wonderfully.
  • QueerdooQueerdoo Registered User
    edited January 2009
    Linksys WRT54GL with DD-WRT firmware...
  • Marty PostmaMarty Postma Registered User
    edited January 2009
    Netgear Dual-band-N has the best range. (it also has nice blinky blue lights on it to match the console;) )
  • ryanwilkinsonryanwilkinson Registered User
    edited January 2009
    I own 2 of the Dlink DI-524's and had numerous problems with the router just deciding to restart, which in turn means the board would stop responding..

    Now I have a cisco 1231g access point, and manually assign IP addressing.. Much more stable.. And I use a Netgear 24 port 1gb smart switch..

    although not using it for hog, the Apple extreme base stations are very good with throughput and management. very stable as well. They are also gigabit and N class.

    Ryan
  • stephenwykerstephenwyker Registered User, DL Beta, Hog Beta
    edited February 2009
    I've had great luck with my Cisco Aironet 1142- Yes, it's expensive, but it is bullet-proof. It has amazing distance alone, but if you add the paddles, i can walk almost a block away (in NYC) -- I've got it connected to a Cisco Catalyst 500. I've even went so far as to segment the traffic into protected VLANs so I can use this switch safely for H3DMX, H2PC to artnet to Arkaos, and internet/computer traffic. I can remotely access this network via VPN, so if I got really bored, I could see (or control) my hognet from anywhere.
  • Frankv1234Frankv1234 Registered User
    edited February 2009
    We use apple airport extreme. And for range extending apple airport express. It works great, when youre wireless network gets a little weak simply find a power socket and plug in a airport express and you are done !

    We've used linksys wrt54g routers in the past but had some problems with the build in dhcp server that somethimes doesn't give adresses to the wireless clients.
  • ryanwilkinsonryanwilkinson Registered User
    edited February 2009
    I swear those Apple airport extremes are the best routers and wifi access points in the consumer market. I have put in a few with installed systems like AMX and have worked extremely well especially for the price point.
  • Woodj32177Woodj32177 Registered User
    edited February 2009
    I love my airport extreme,
    However it seems to be a common problem, if you try to move a large file, or delete a large file on the air disk, it will crash the router.
    (Large File =>1GB)
    Not a common problem in a show situation, but Just FYI.
    Don't use the airdisk function when in a show situation.
    Joshua Wood
  • Frankv1234Frankv1234 Registered User
    edited February 2009
    do you no how to configure the airdisk so i can make a backup on usb key from my wh3 using the mapped network drive ??

    The backup file is quite small so it wont be a problem and i could finally throw away these zip disks
  • barnes2000barnes2000 Registered User, Hog Beta
    edited February 2009
    I use a Linksys WRT600N Dual Band gigabit router. It has great range. Also, many of the rigs I work on utilize WDMX which can interfere with wireless G routers. The wireless N routers work on a 5Ghz range which doesn't interfere with the WDMX.
    I know of a programmer who had two Wholehog3 consoles on one network. The client console was actually connected to his wireless N router via a Wireless N gaming adapter. He had that console on a compact rolling desk that he could roll around anywhere on the set and use. It worked great.
  • ryanwilkinsonryanwilkinson Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Woodj32177 wrote: »
    I love my airport extreme,
    However it seems to be a common problem, if you try to move a large file, or delete a large file on the air disk, it will crash the router.
    (Large File =>1GB)
    Not a common problem in a show situation, but Just FYI.
    Don't use the airdisk function when in a show situation.
    Joshua Wood

    I tried to use the air disk thing once and wasn't very impressed with the speed.. plus I don't really have much of a need for it, so yea.. I just don't use it.

    As far as using the Airport with the hog 3, I haven't done it so I am guessing here.. But you can give it a try. The share name should be the ip address of the basestation. ex. '192.168.0.1'. (try that first and if that isn't it, try '192.168.0.1/name_of_hard_drive'.) If you use just the ip address then the share name should be 'name_of_hard_drive/file_name_on_hard_drive' or 'file_name_on_hard_drive'. The domain should be blank. The username should be blank.. not sure about that one. The password is only needed if you have one active. I believe you can create user/password settings for the hard drive but I can't remember off the top of my head.. If you can't get it to work, then let me know and I will mess with it.

    Ryan
  • Richard RasmussenRichard Rasmussen Registered User, Hog Beta
    edited February 2009
    I just bought the wrt610n last week. It's working great so far. I love the built in Network Storage for file backup's. You can throw a USB flash drive right in the back of it. It's the same as Scott's but the new version so it has the dual band as well. It has an internal antenna as opposed to Scott's that has the external. I wonder if the internal works as good as the external?
  • AndrisAndris Registered User
    edited February 2009
    +1 for the Airport Extreme / Express, solid connections and easy to setup!
    The Express is a great little 'swiss army knife' gadget, I never venture into a hotel room without one!

    I also have to second flashing any router that is capable of supporting DD-WRT with the latest firmware. I had a Linksys WRT54G for years running DD-WRT firmware and it was rock solid and you could also boost the power of the RF section! It really made a $60 plastic box worth twice its weight in gold.

    Here is the explanation of DD-WRT
  • ryanwilkinsonryanwilkinson Registered User
    edited February 2009
    I am going to have to mess with the DD-WRT software on one of these boxes.. that seems to be really useful.. and pretty cool!
  • wizardwizard Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Just a comment... I tend to stay away from routers and use manual IP assigning or one of the consoles as DHCP and just put swithces and wireless access points if required. I tried routers a few times but felt it was too much hassle to be worth it.
  • ryanwilkinsonryanwilkinson Registered User
    edited February 2009
    I completely agree.. Ever since I used the DI542's and had the thing crap out on me then the console crash, I will only use manual addressing.. but now that the console has a DHCP server its kind of nice.. And since I am using a cisco access point, its only an access point and nothing between the path.
  • Joe BleasdaleJoe Bleasdale Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Can anybody reccomend a good rack mount router with an N+ wireless rating?

    Thanks,
  • edited June 2009
    > Can anybody reccomend a good rack mount
    > router with an N+ wireless rating?

    I don't know of much Rackmount wireless gear. Rack mounting doesn't lend itself to good RF propagation.

    Some of the "Enterprise" WiFi gear has a rackmount controller, but those usually use remotely located RF heads.

    Your best bet is probably to get creative with an empty rack shelf and some mounting screws.
  • Joe BleasdaleJoe Bleasdale Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Hi Eric,

    Thanks for that. I will experiment...
  • XOP15XOP15 Registered User, Hog Beta
    edited June 2009
    Apple Airport Extreme all the way, easy to set up. I use mine with DHCP to sort out all the IP Address's, up and running in seconds.
  • Joe BleasdaleJoe Bleasdale Registered User
    edited June 2009
    XOP15 wrote: »
    Apple Airport Extreme all the way, easy to set up. I use mine with DHCP to sort out all the IP Address's, up and running in seconds.

    Does that only work with a Mac network though... Some of my computers will be running windows...
  • jxgriffijxgriffi Registered User, DL Beta, Hog Beta
    edited June 2009
    No Joe...networking is networking.

    You can mix PC's, Mac's, Unix, Linux....
  • Joe BleasdaleJoe Bleasdale Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Ahh Cool. I will probably have one FOH and one near the stage for wireless remote focus.

    Thanks Jon,
  • Woodj32177Woodj32177 Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Exactly,
    They even include a utility to configure the mac router from your windows pc.
    Also, to follow up with the issues I had with large file transfers on my airport extreme,
    I replaced my airport extreme under warranty, and it has been flawless ever since.
    Best router I have ever owned by far!
    And I live in a townhouse, with at least 15-20 wireless networks visible to my computer in my living room.
    I have never had the wireless drop out with my apple base station.
    I have had multiple problems with my linksys, netgear, and a microsoft router.
    my apple extreme solved all those problems.
    I wish I had bought this one the first time, and I would have saved myself 3 cheaper router purchases.
    Thats what i get for trying to go with the cheaper option.
    Joshua Wood
  • Woodj32177Woodj32177 Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Also, with the airport series, you could use an airport express as a wireless extender.
    And save yourself the cost of a second airport extreme.
    Joshua Wood
  • XOP15XOP15 Registered User, Hog Beta
    edited June 2009
    hi Joe, yes everyone is right here, the airport extreme works with any setup and is very easy to configure (typically apple !) I run my IPC straight into the AE and wirelessly connect to a motion computing tablet for remote focus.
  • dslodkidslodki Registered User
    edited June 2009
    A note on manual IP addressing, which is really the best policy with the networks...although setting down a list of all your devices and writing out your IP addresses for each ahead of time is a good way to keep things organized and clear, i.e. all consoles in the 192.168.1.1xx range, all DPs in the 192.168.1.2xx range, etc., if time or aptitude is a consideration, by connecting the network and all its components and setting on ONLY ONE device to hand out addresses via DHCP, and all OTHER components to receive IP addresses via DHCP, you will then have received network wide IP addresses automatically. Then, turn off receive IP addresses via DHCP and those last addresses handed out will remain (autofill) as the Static IP addresses. Your network is now complete with static IP addresses. Turn off DHCP. A word of caution (thanks J. Thatcher) beware of any devices which still have their default IP addresses as 192.168.1.1 etc., this default will knock things offline as it will nearly always conflict with another default address on a device. (for example a new network drive and a new wireless router or card, etc.) Another consideration is that the WH3 will put out addresses in the 172.31.xxx.xxx range while a wireless router will hand out in the 192.168.xxx.xxx range. I have a hunch, and I welcome comments about this, that it's easier to set up a network in the 192.168 range, especially when network drives and wireless routers are to be added.
  • jxgriffijxgriffi Registered User, DL Beta, Hog Beta
    edited June 2009
    Dave,

    Routers can be set to hand out IP addresses in whatever range you want. It just has to be setup properly.

    I'm using 2 networks for my lighting system. HogNet and Artnet. Both have separate routers for wireless access as needed.

    For my Hognet side, the console itself acts at the DHCP server and dolls out 172.31.x.x range. For my Artnet side, my ROUTER is the DHCP server and dolls out 2.1.x.x range.

    Hope that helps...
  • dslodkidslodki Registered User
    edited June 2009
    jxgriffi wrote: »
    Dave,

    Routers can be set to hand out IP addresses in whatever range you want. It just has to be setup properly.

    I'm using 2 networks for my lighting system. HogNet and Artnet. Both have separate routers for wireless access as needed.

    For my Hognet side, the console itself acts at the DHCP server and dolls out 172.31.x.x range. For my Artnet side, my ROUTER is the DHCP server and dolls out 2.1.x.x range.

    Hope that helps...

    Sure thing, I understand that, I was just putting out a strategy for easily getting static IP addresses, especially if one is not 100% proficient in the dark arts of the Internet Protocol. To get back on topic, I use Linksys for all my networking.
  • Joe BleasdaleJoe Bleasdale Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Thanks Jon and Dave. I am almost certain I will get the Airport extreme. I went into the store to take a good look at them. They seem really good quality and by the look of stock levels, they were quite popular too. I have also managed to aquire some 100/1000base switches and hubs from the school I have just left. They have just spent a fortune and put a fibre backbone in and replaced every switch in the school. :D

    Thanks for all your input on this thread guys!
  • rblazovicrblazovic Registered User
    edited July 2009
    Just a thought...Middle Atlantic can provide rackmount shelf with a custom faceplate for nearly anything. I use them all the time for things like consumer DVD players. The bottom of the shelf also has slots that can be used to lace down the cords so they don't come loose. And they have templates for a pretty impressive amount of gear already on hand. You could probably even get them to do something that would allow you to remote the antenna(s) to the front panel like Shure does with their wireless rigs. Some routers have add-on antennas that might work here. The shelves cost under $100. And be sure to order the clamp option which will secure the item on the shelf from moving about in transport.
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