RHFB on corporate network

BBCLDBBCLD Registered User, Hog Beta
I have looked but can't seem to find anything like this on the forums.

Is there a way to put a Hog (any Hog, but I happen to have a RHFB) on a corporate network without it broadcasting DHCP and basically shutting down an entire network? I don't have it on one right now but it would make certain things easier for me if I could. I have tried turning off the DHCP and Boot server button but it still manages to broadcast. I have given the Hog a static IP when on that network so that my laptop can see it easier. I would like to set it up on the network in order remote the desk from my office and not have to run to the booth every time someone needs me to run a demo.

Just wondering. Any ideas are helpful.

Thanks,
Eric

Comments

  • AndrisAndris Registered User
    edited January 2012
    Have you tried using VLANs to segregate your hog network traffic?
  • edited January 2012
    BBCLD wrote: »
    Is there a way to put a Hog (any Hog, but I happen to have a RHFB) on a corporate network without it broadcasting DHCP and basically shutting down an entire network? I don't have it on one right now but it would make certain things easier for me if I could. I have tried turning off the DHCP and Boot server button but it still manages to broadcast.

    You'll need to provide a lot more details on what's happening with the network, and how it's "Shutting Down" for anyone to provide meaningful advice.

    If you turn off the DHCP server, then the console won't hand out IP addresses. At that point it's just a network device like anything else on the network. Even when DHCP is enabled, it doesn't "Broadcast" DHCP. It waits for a request and then replies to that request. A standard DHCP lease sequence is about 4 packets, so that alone won't overwhelm a network. If you think it's handing out IP addresses even when the server is off, you can verify that by looking at the DHCP lease details on another machine on the network.

    You'll need to determine what else is happening with the network. Check the log files on your network systems and servers. Write down any error messages that occur.

    For live shows, we recommending using a separate network (not connected to the Internet) for lighting.
  • BBCLDBBCLD Registered User, Hog Beta
    edited January 2012
    What is happening is that when people boot up their computers they are getting the IP address from the Hog instead of from the network servers as they should, which causes problems for that user/printer/server.

    I am really wanting to be able to connect my laptop to the Hog Net through the corporate network (either wirelessly or hard wired) to start demos or use as a RFU from the stage. Plus I am hoping this would alleviate some of the challenges I am having with one of my Hog PC systems jumping on and off the network while trying to use WYSIWYG. I am wondering if I could also monitor our other campus on WYG by having the Hog PC running there and WYG here mostly during their rehearsals realizing there will be some latency. I can think of a bunch or ways that this would benefit my job and help my volunteers at the same time.

    I just want to use our network to help with keeping tabs on the various Hog systems I am using without having to create an independant network over several miles.
  • z6p6tist6z6p6tist6 Registered User
    edited January 2012
    Eric,

    Eric Johnson is the most knowledgeable person on this stuff, but I'll add this...

    If you do not have a very high competence (read: expertise) with computer networking, I would recommend against this.

    The Hog can put a lot of data on to the network and make your network admins unhappy.

    But with that being said, you've got the right idea. Turn off the DHCP server (you don't have to turn off the boot server). Give the console a static IP address or let it get one from the router on the network ('Obtain an IP address using DHCP' in the network settings window).

    From your desktop you should then be able to join a network show from Hog3PC.

    PG
  • z6p6tist6z6p6tist6 Registered User
    edited January 2012
    This can work fine if you are in control of the entire network.

    I like my consoles to have static IP addresses, so a mixed network that I set up might look something like this...

    [Router]
    LAN IP 192.168.0.1
    Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
    WAN IP (Whatever is handed to you by your ISP)
    DHCP Range: 192.168.0.101-192.168.0.199

    [Computers]
    Automatically assigned by DHCP
    Will be in the range 192.168.0.101-192.168.199 with the subnet mask 255.255.255.0

    [Consoles]
    IP Address: 192.168.0.201 (.202-.255 reserved for Hog-Net devices)
    Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
    DHCP Server off
    Show server on
    Boot server on
  • z6p6tist6z6p6tist6 Registered User
    edited January 2012
    I would not ever consider running a Hog3PC client connected to WYG on another campus while the console is being used for a show.

    That sounds like a very bad idea.

    Not saying it won't work. But I wouldn't allow it on one of my shows.
  • BBCLDBBCLD Registered User, Hog Beta
    edited January 2012
    Ok, thanks. These are some things I just wanted to try. I have a lot going on Sunday mornings and it would just be nice to keep track of it across our network. So much potential. I am already using Team Viewer and accessing the Hog PC across the network but the possibility of using my laptop as a RFU to access the local show without having to switch networks would be outstanding. I will keep trying.

    And concerning WYG across the network, sounds like a cool idea, but not sure if it would work. As I said, I can think of a lot of creative uses if it would work but not sure of the feasibility.
  • erockerock Registered User
    edited January 2012
    How about putting a computer running Hog 3PC in the booth with the RHFB and putting a second network card in it. One card is on the hog network and the other one is on the main network. And then use Windows remote desktop to log into this booth computer and control the console this way. I had a computer at work for years that had three network cards in it, one for the hog, one for ETC net and one for the office network/internet and I could control this computer and thus the hog console from anywhere via the internet while still keeping all the networks seperate.

    Eric
  • edited January 2012
    BBCLD wrote: »
    What is happening is that when people boot up their computers they are getting the IP address from the Hog instead of from the network servers as they should, which causes problems for that user/printer/server.

    Odd, this shouldn't be happening. If you've turned off the DHCP *server* in the console, it should not be handing out IP addresses at all. Turning the DHCP server on/off should take effect immediately, but it wouldn't hurt to reboot afterwards for good measure. Can you verify that the DHCP server is off? Also remember that the settings can change any time you re-image the OS.

    Also, is it possible that your PCs just had a lease leftover from when the DHCP server was still on? If you force the system to release and renew, does it still get a lease from the console?

    Our test lab reconfigures DHCP servers all the time, and I've never heard of a problem. Heck, the RND network at HES has a ton of hogs on it without any issues. But there could be something we've missed. If you can figure out when the problem occurs, take a screenshot of all of your network settings on the console and post it.
    BBCLD wrote: »
    I just want to use our network to help with keeping tabs on the various Hog systems I am using without having to create an independant network over several miles.

    This will depend on how your network is setup. Hogs are used in some very large installations, so it can be done. If your network is a flat layer 2 (switched) network, then it should work. If your network uses Layer 3 (routing) then you'll need to do some network configuration to make sure that the multicast traffic can cross the routers.

    For the most parts, hogs get along well with larger networks. The one caveat is that HogNet (and Art-Net and E1.31) use a massive amount of multicast traffic. Some network switches see this traffic and interpret it as a denial of service attack. They either cut off or rate limit the port. If this occurs, you'll need to disable multicast/broadcast rate limiting in the switches.
  • edited January 2012
    BBCLD wrote: »
    Ok, thanks. These are some things I just wanted to try. I have a lot going on Sunday mornings and it would just be nice to keep track of it across our network.

    So perhaps I was being a bit dense, but I only just now looked at your username. The BBC seems to be writ-large across the history of UK entertainment technology. It seems like ever time I run into a UK-er, they have some connection to the BBC.

    What you're trying to do is a common setup. You have multiple independent shows going on. Run each show on a different port Number (in the settings available before you launch a show). Then, by changing the port number, you can join any show and have a look at what's going on.

    As for WYG, you could use the visualizer connectivity feature, although I'd agree with others that doing that for a live show may not be the best idea. Also, look at the Hog's E1.31/sACN and/or Art-Net outputs. Most visualizers should be able to accept these. Just be *very* careful about putting these on a larger corporate network. Most IT types don't understand entertainment protocols.
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